Wednesday, November 16, 2016

Bread Baking Babes and rye porridge

A great choice this month by our Babe Kelly ("A Messy Kitchen"), a bread with rye flour and grits. You start by making a porridge of the rye ingredients.... no work whatsoever, boil, pour, stir and leave for the night. This is your starter of a delicious, healthy bread.

I made this bread once before in 2006, it turned out better than that time, so I must have learned something in the years in between.. or it's just luck. It is a lovely bread and a nice bread to bake, it reminded me of several breads from the third "Tartine" book that I baked in the meantime. UPDATE: thanks to Elizabeth I discovered that I totally missed that the baking starts in a cold oven. I adjusted the recipe as I just baked in a pre heated oven as I normally do.

We would love you to bake this great loaf with us and become our Bread Baking Buddy. Here's how: (I copied this from Kelly)  Just bake your version of this bread by November 30th and send her a note with your results and a picture or link to your post at eleyana(AT)aol(DOT)com with Buddy Bread in the subject line and she will include you in our buddy round up at the beginning of next month and send you a badge to keep and/or add to your post.  You don't have to have a blog to participate, a picture is fine!

Thanks Kelly for having me revisite this lovely loaf! Get baking Buddies and have fun.

Porridge Bread (Pain Bouillie)
makes two small loaves in one pan
(PRINT recipe)
Porridge
18 g honey
410 g boiling water
110 g whole rye flour
150 g cracked rye grain

dough
1 tsp active dry yeast (3 g)
45 g warm water, divided
All of the bouillie from the previous step
10 g sea salt
2 tsp caraway seeds
1 TBsp raisins
± 240 g unbleached white
make the porridge starter: Mix the honey into the boiling water until dissolved.  Pour it over the rye flour and grain in a bowl.  Let it soak for a few minutes, then give it a stir to make sure all the flour is moistened.  Cover the bowl and set aside overnight in a warm area.

For the dough:
Dissolve the yeast in 2 TBsp of the warm water.  Put all of the porridge (bouillie) into a madium bowl or stand mixer and mix in the salt.  Crush the caraway seeds with a mortar and pestle until fragrant and broken.  Add the raisins and grind into a paste.  Stir the last 1 TBsp water into the caraway/raisin paste.  Add 2 tsp of the resulting caraway flavoring into the porridge.  Slowly 200 g of flour, mixing in on low speed or with a plastic dough scraper.  Mix in the yeast.  Continue adding the remaining flour slowly until the dough is a medium firm consistency.  Knead for 5-8 minutes, adding a little more white flour if necessary.  The dough will be sticky but should be firm.

Put the dough in the bowl, cover with a moist towel, and let rise in an unlit oven (or warm place) for 1½ - 2 hours.

When the dough has doubled, cut into two pieces.  Shape into two short logs.  Grease 23 cm x 13 cm bread pan (or another size that fits them) and oil one side of each loaf.  Place them together in the pan with the oiled sides touching.

Cover again with a moist towel and let rise for 30-45 minutes in a cold oven until the dough has crested the edge of the pan by 1 cm.

Slash the top of each loaf with a little 5 cm cut, and brush tops with oil.

Preheat the oven to 230ºC and put the loaves in to bake, with added steam.  Bake for 15 minutes.  Reduce heat to 200ºC and bake for 15-25 minutes longer.  They will be quite dark,  but you can tent with foil before it gets too dark (I did).  Check the core temperature of the loaf: it should be 96ºC.

Cool on a wire rack and slice thinly when bread is completely cooled.
 
(source: Joe Ortiz – the village baker)

5 comments:

Elizabeth said...

Your loaf looks perfect! I love the nice dark colour of the crust. And the scoring is stellar.

I don't think it was luck that it turned out better this time than the first time - it must have been skill.

Karen Kerr said...

Your loaf looks like it had some oven spring! Looks amazing!

MyKitchenInHalfCups said...

Skill, yes, I think Elizabeth is right. I think we are learning. Some of bread learning is our fingers-to-brain unconscious connection that eventually becomes a 6th sense.
I did find this to be a wonderful easy bread, one can almost bake the spur of the moment.

hobby baker said...

Beautiful slashes, awesome oven spring, and gorgeous crumb! Maybe the hot oven is the way to go. I put a note in my post about the troubles many of us had with a cold start.

Katie Zeller said...

These are beautiful... Can't imagine the problem you had way back when but these are stellar. And I love the 2 smaller loaves!